write the following

geology project and need a sample draft to help me learn.

Executive Summary/Abstract
Site History/Description
Geology
Hydrology
Hydrogeology
Requirements: as required
October 9, 2023 Groundwater Consulting Professionals Colorado State University Fort Collins, CO Dear Groundwater Professionals, I am writing to you today to request your help in creating a hydrogeologic site characterization of the Seymour superfund contamination site in Seymour, Indiana. In the 1970s, the Seymour Recycling Corporation operated a recycling plant to process hazardous waste. In 1979, the company went bankrupt and abandoned the site, leaving behind 98 storage tanks and ~50,000 55-gallon drums of chemical waste. The site was placed under jurisdiction of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), who completed site remediation from 1982 – 1984. Continuous site monitoring has existed until present. Platte Chemical Company has collected hydrogeologic data from the site, including borehole logs, water levels, contaminant concentrations, and geology, and we have created a base map of the site. Like most clients, we are very busy and do not have the necessary background knowledge in hydrogeology. We need a thorough, well-organized, concise report of the site characterization data you have collected and reviewed. Some of the ways I will use this report include a) explaining the site status to my bosses, b) negotiating/communicating with regulatory agencies, c) evaluating potential risks and liabilities associated with the site, and d) determining the next course of action. All the data collected can be found in a file called Lab7_8_9_Seymour.pdf. Within that file are questions about the site and data that will assist in writing your report. These questions are not required but are on topics that should be addressed. In addition, necessary maps are for plotting data are included in the file Lab7_8_9_Seymourmaps.pdf. Please note that there are specific maps for specific topics. There are captions on the maps that indicate what data are to be displayed. Below are sections and topics for the report (some topics require additional research). • Executive Summary (Abstract) • Introduction / Site History • General Site Description • Geology / Hydrology / Hydrogeology • Nature and Extent of Contamination • Evaluation of Potential Receptors and Potential Exposure Pathways (e.g., site workers, general public, surface waters, ecology, etc.) • Remediation (use your knowledge of hydrogeology, but additional research will most likely be necessary) (What are the options? What are the advantages/disadvantages of each alternative?) • Recommendations (Specifically, from the options you explained, what should you do next? Why is this the best option? Have a clear detailed remediation goal in mind.) • Tables (include where appropriate and make sure to include units) • Figures (e.g., site location, cross-sections, potentiometric maps, isoconcentration map, etc.) Make sure you replace predetermined captions with your own and include figure numbers, scales, vertical exaggerations, north arrows, legends, titles, etc. • References (include where specific sources can be found; use proper reference formatting) • There are questions asked in the background materials – incorporate their answers as part of your report. We paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to collect these site characterization data, and your report is the only tangible item we will receive for all that money. Do a good job! Sincerely, John Smith Platte Chemical Company.
October 9, 2023 This assignment is for a grade, but imagine your job depends on its quality. Be sure you review the corresponding technical writing guide (Lab7_8_9_SeymourTechnicalWritingGuide.pdf) and follow its recommendations. If you are not a strong writer, seek help from the CSU Writing Center! Instructions: • This will be a group project. As a group, each member will be assigned specific topics. You will need to work together as a team. Each member has an obligation to complete their work in a timely manner and produce quality work. • All the data are found in Lab 16 to Lab 18 (Seymour Hazardous Waste Site I – III) from the Lab7_8_9_Seymour.pdf file. Please read the material to familiarize yourselves with the data and the work you will be doing for this project. Bring these materials and notes you have to class. You will need pencils and erasers. • You will have three full lab periods to work on this project. • Due dates are outlined below. What is due: Date: Introduce the assignment: begin assigning topics and organizing what is needed (start outline) 10/09/2023 Outline detailing group member responsibilities. Bring draft contour maps and answers to questions if you have them. Nick will assist you with the answers. 10/16/2023 Full lab period. Bring nearly finalized maps. 10/23/2023 Final Report Due 10/30/2023 This project will be graded qualitatively and is worth 300 lab points. All members of each consulting firm will earn a possible 200 points from the group grade and 100 points from the assessed individual’s contribution (this individual grade will reflect the group grade unless explicit complaints or compliments are received regarding groupmate performance; see file Lab7_8_9_SeymourReportReviewSheet.docx for grading criteria). An outline of who is responsible for the various aspects of the report is due October 16, 2023 at the beginning of lab. Please bring negative and positive group dynamics to our attention when you believe a group member deserves recognition for either. ABSOLUTELY, POSITIVELY, UNEQUIVOCALLY NO LATE REPORTS ACCEPTED!
Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 1 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Contents Part 1: Common Usage Issues & Answers ………………………………….. 2 Bulleted Lists ……………………………………………………………………. 2 Numbered Lists …………………………………………………………………. 2 Consistent Terminology ……………………………………………………… 2 ÒBecause ofÓ vs. ÒDue toÓ …………………………………………………… 3 ÒWhichÓ vs. ÒThatÓ ……………………………………………………………. 3 Adverbs Such as ÒHoweverÓ and ÒThereforeÓ ……………………….. 3 Part 2: Numbers ………………………………………………………………………. 4 General Rule ……………………………………………………………………… 4 Dates ………………………………………………………………………………… 5 Decimal Fractions ……………………………………………………………… 5 Fractions …………………………………………………………………………… 5 Ordinal Numbers (First, Second, Third, etc.) …………………………. 5 Scientific Notation …………………………………………………………….. 6 Significant Figures …………………………………………………………….. 6 Time ………………………………………………………………………………… 6 Part 3: Acronyms & Abbreviations …………………………………………….. 7 First Use …………………………………………………………………………… 7 Latin Terms ………………………………………………………………………. 7 Units of Measurement ………………………………………………………… 7 Part 4: Punctuation ………………………………………………………………….. 8 Items in Series (the ÒSerial CommaÓ) …………………………………… 8 Formal Nouns ……………………………………………………………………. 8 Plural Forms of Formal Nouns …………………………………………….. 8 Apostrophes ………………………………………………………………………. 8 Quotation Marks ………………………………………………………………… 9 Lists …………………………………………………………………………………. 9 Commas in Numbers ………………………………………………………….. 9 Addresses …………………………………………………………………………. 9 Dates ………………………………………………………………………………. 10 Seasons …………………………………………………………………………… 10 Part 5: References ………………………………………………………………….. 11 References / Bibliography …………………………………………………. 11 Citing References …………………………………………………………….. 12 Citing Figures and Tables …………………………………………………. 13 Part 6: Compound Modifiers & Hyphenation ……………………………… 14 Unit Modifiers …………………………………………………………………. 14 Special Cases …………………………………………………………………… 14
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 1: COMMON USAGE ISSUES & ANSWERS Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 2 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Part 1: Common Usage Issues & Answers Bulleted Lists Use bullets for lists when rank or sequence is unimportant; otherwise, use numbered lists. Also, keep the structure of the items in the list parallel. Potential management strategies include: È Pumping only during periods when… È Directly injecting pumped water… È Improving and restoring riparian habitat… NotÉ Potential management strategies include: È Pumping only during periods when… È Direct injection of pumped water… È Improve and restore riparian habitat… Numbered Lists Number list items when sequence or rank is important. This rule also applies to items listed in series (numbers should be enclosed in parentheses). Maintain parallel structure. The drilling and sampling procedure followed at each location was as follows: 1. Drill to 36 inches and drive the split spoon to 54 inches. 2. Remove the samples from the split spoon at the 36- to 48-inch interval. 3. Fill the hole with bentonite chips before and while withdrawing augers. Several criteria were used in selecting a site for drilling: (1) yield, (2) water quali-ty, and (3) drill rig accessibility. Consistent Terminology Once you establish terminology for an aquifer, site name, project name, or physiographic feature, stick with it throughout the reportÉ and the project. Define or explain these terms up front.
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 1: COMMON USAGE ISSUES & ANSWERS Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 3 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com ÒBecause ofÓ vs. ÒDue toÓ The phrase Òdue toÓ is acceptable after forms of the verb Òto beÓ Ñ but not after other verbs. The observed rise in water level was due to changes in barometric pressure. Water levels rose because of changes in barometric pressure. ÒWhichÓ vs. ÒThatÓ Use ÒwhichÓ only with nonrestrictive clauses. Nonrestrictive clauses are set off by commas and do not affect the basic meaning of the sentence. Use ÒthatÓ with restrictive clauses. Restrictive clauses do not require commas and are essential to the meaning of the sen-tence. MW-9, which is located on 14th Street, responded during the pumping test. One of the wells that responded during the test is MW-9. Adverbs Such as ÒHoweverÓ and ÒThereforeÓ Words like Òhowever,Ó Òtherefore,Ó Ònevertheless,Ó Òconsequently,Ó Òsubsequently,Ó Òhence,Ó and ÒthusÓ are adverbs that join two independent clauses. An independent clause is one that could stand alone as a sentence: It contains both a subject and a verb. When joining two independent clauses with an adverb, use a semicolon before the adverb and a comma after it. If you are not using the adverb to join two independent clauses, however, use only commas. … analytical results for Well X suggest that benzene was present in May 1995; however, benzene was also detected in the field blank. If you are not using the adverb to join two independent clauses, however, use only commas. Tip ………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. There is a simple test to determine whether you should use a semicolon with your adverbÑtry changing its position. In the second example, you could also say Éif, however, you are not using the adverb to join two independent clausesÉ or However, if you are not using the adverb to join two independent clausesÉ If you can change its position easily without impacting its meaning significantly, donÕt use a semicolon.
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 2: NUMBERS Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 4 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Part 2: Numbers General Rule In general, for text, write out integers less than 10 but use numerals to express all other numbers. For tables and graphs, always use numerals. four sites 11 basins three wells 24 gauging stations Follow the general rule except when: ¥ The number represents a physical quantity. ¥ The number is the first word in a sentence. ¥ Several numbers appear in the same sentence. Physical Quantities ……………………………………………………………………………………. Use numerals for physical quantities that can be measured, such as length, area, volume, pressure, temperature, distance, flow rate, time, porosity, permeability, and transmissivity. Before sampling, over 3 gallons of water were purged from the well, which was 9 feet deep and 4 inches in diameter. The pumping test at Well 3 lasted 6 days, 4 hours, and 30 minutes. Using a Number as the First Word in Sentence …………………………………………….. Write out numbers that begin a sentence, even if they would otherwise be written as nu-merals; better yet, rewrite the sentence so it doesnÕt begin with a number. Twenty-four hours after pumping stopped, water levels recovered to pre-pumping conditions. Water levels recovered to pre-pumping conditions 24 hours after pumping stopped. Sentence Contains More than One Number …………………………………………………. When several numbers that apply to the same category appear together in the same sen-tence, express them alike, regardless of other rules or guidelines.
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 2: NUMBERS Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 5 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Samples were collected from 15 wells in the shallow aquifer and 6 wells in the deep aquifer. Dates Use numerals (symbols) for the day and year. If only a month and year are cited, no comma is necessary. If the date follows the month-day-year format, commas must precede and follow the year. The project was completed in January 1992 for Acme. The project was completed on January 15, 1992, for Acme. Decimal Fractions Always place a zero in front of decimal fractions less than 1.00, except for statistical pa-rameters that can never exceed 1.00, such as probability, correlation coefficient, and level of significance. Benzene levels in the sample decreased from 0.54 to 0.08 over the 2-year period. Figure 2 shows an R-factor of .86 for the streamflow data. Fractions Use numerals (symbols) when fractions express units of measurement and when they are written with whole numbers; otherwise, write them out. one-half of the oranges 2 1/2 cups of flour one-third of the pie 1/3 mile Ordinal Numbers (First, Second, Third, etc.) Use numerals for ordinal numbers, which express degree or sequence, only when they are single words. first in line 100th meridian 47th parallel 21st century fourth place sixteenth iteration
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 2: NUMBERS Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 6 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Scientific Notation Use scientific notation for storage coefficient and for hydraulic conductivity expressed in metric units (cm/sec), unless the values for these parameters are unusually large. Scientific notation is also preferred for small values of hydraulic gradient. Not only does scientific no-tation emphasize the order of magnitude of a number, but it also allows readers to com-pare values easily. Remember, regardless of which convention you use, be consistent throughout the document for each parameter. The analysis yielded a storage coefficient of 1×10-5, indicating confined aquifer conditions. The hydraulic gradient at the site was 1.85×10-3. Significant Figures The number of significant figures you report indicates the accuracy of a value, whether this value reflects a measurement or a number you have calculated. In theory, any number you calculate can only be as accurate as the least accurate number used in the calculation Ñ and you should report it as such. Use DarcyÕs Law (Q=KIA) to calculate flow rate (Q), assuming: K = 50 ft/day I = 0.020 A =1,250 ft2. Since the least accurate numbers in the calculationÑ50 and 0.020Ñonly contain two sig-nificant figures, you must round the product to two significant figures. The result should be reported as 6.5 gpm (after converting 1,250 ft3/day to gpm). Time Use numerals (symbols) to express hours and minutes when Òa.m.Ó and Òp.m.Ó follow, but write out the time if Òa.m.Ó and Òp.m.Ó do not follow. Also, when discussing pumping test data, use the military conventions for time. The drillers arrived on site at 8:00 a.m. They left the site at four oÕclock. The data loggers began recording measurements at 14:00 on September 3, 1996.
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 3: ACRONYMS & ABBREVIATIONS Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 7 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Part 3: Acronyms & Abbreviations First Use The first time you use a new term in a report, write it out, followed by its abbreviation or ac-ronym in parentheses. For large reports, itÕs best to include a list of acronyms and abbrevi-ations. The anticipated yield from Well 5 is 4 million gallons per day (mgd). The cleanup was conducted under the Model Toxics Control Act (MTCA). Latin Terms Avoid using Òi.e.Ó and Òe.g.Ó Instead, write out Òthat isÓ or Òfor exampleÓ Ñ or rewrite the sentence. Use Òand othersÓ rather than Òet al.Ó when listing or citing a reference. Units of Measurement Write out units like Òfeet,Ó Òinches,Ó Òcentimeters,Ó etc., unless they are part of a compound unit (one that contains a numerator and denominator) such as gpm, gpd/ft or cm/sec. Never use symbols for feet and inches Ñ either in text, tables, or illustrations Ñ because they resemble single and double quotation marks. The well was completed with a 16-inch telescoping screen. Aquifer transmissivity is estimated to be 100,000 gpd/ft. The projected yield at Well 2 is 2,500 gpm (3.5 mgd).
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 4: PUNCTUATION Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 8 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Part 4: Punctuation Items in Series (the ÒSerial CommaÓ) Use a comma after each item in a list or series, including the item before the word ÒandÓ or Òor.Ó This leaves no doubt about the intended meaning of the sentence. Quality assurance objectives for measurements are usually expressed in terms of accuracy, precision, completeness, representativeness, and compatibility. Formal Nouns Capitalize formal nouns (names of places, things). Colorado River Bullhead City The word ÒcityÓ and similar terms require no capitalization unless they are part of a formal name. However, the governmental entity is capitalized: The City approved our scope of work. Formal nouns include formation names that have been formally designated by the USGS. Supai Formation Kaibab Limestone Plural Forms of Formal Nouns Capitalize both the singular and plural forms of formal nouns. White and Green Rivers Apostrophes Use apostrophes to only denote possession and to express contractions. Use them in plu-ral acronyms, abbreviations, and years only when not doing so would confuse the reader. 1900s VOCs Ph.D.Õs BtuÕs xÕs and yÕs
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 4: PUNCTUATION Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 9 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com The word ÒitsÓ denotes the possessive form of Òit,Ó whereas the word ÒitÕsÓ denotes the conjunction for Òit is.Ó Quotation Marks Place quotation marks outside of commas and periods, but inside of colons and semico-lons. This component of drawdown is known as Òwell loss.Ó This component of drawdown is known as Òwell lossÓ; it accounts for more than 70 percentÉ. Lists If the items in a bulleted or numbered list are not complete sentences, you can either ¥ End each item in the list with no punctuation. ¥ Use a comma or semicolon after each item and a period at the end. ¥ End each item in the list with a period. For all three options, capitalize the first word of each item. Commas in Numbers Use commas to separate groups of three digits for all numbers greater than 999 so readers can easily see the order of magnitude without having to count zeros. For tables and illustra-tions, you need not use commas; however, be consistent within each report. Aquifer transmissivity at the Well 5 site is 40,000 gpd/ft. Addresses Use commas before and after the state when citing a place. LauckÕs Laboratory of Seattle, Washington, performed the chemical analyses.
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 4: PUNCTUATION Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 10 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Dates Separate the year by commas if you include the day and month. Do not use commas if you only include the month and year. The report was completed on May 5, 1995, and was subsequently submitted to NDEQ. The May 1995 report was submitted to NDEQ. Seasons Do not capitalize seasons (fall, spring, summer, and winter) unless you are using them in a formal name. We sampled the wells in the spring of 1996. Éthe Spring 1995 Sampling RoundÉ
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 5: REFERENCES Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 11 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Part 5: References References / Bibliography Books ……………………………………………………………………………………………………… Fetter, C.W. 1980. Applied Hydrogeology. Columbus, OH: Charles E. Merrill Publishing Company. Journal articles …………………………………………………………………………………………. Strack, O.D.L. 1976. ÒA Single-Point Solution for Regional Interface Problems in Coastal Aquifers.Ó Water Resources Research 12(6): 100-105. ConsultantÕs reports ………………………………………………………………………………….. URS Group, Inc. 2006. Draft Decant Station Groundwater Remediation Work Plan, Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant, Grand Island, Nebraska. Consult-antÕs report to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha, NE. Web pages ………………………………………………………………………………………………. References for online sources follow the same conventions as printed matter, with a URL at the end. If little or no publication facts are available, be sure to include descriptive infor-mation so readers can find the source even if the URL become obsolete. Nebraska Department of Natural Resources. 2005. Registered Groundwater Wells Data Retrieval. Online database of registered domestic, irrigation, and indus-trial water wells, updated through June 20, 2005. http://dnrserver26.dnr.state.ne.us/wells. Personal communication …………………………………………………………………………… Simpson, O.J. 1995. Personal communication with Ms. Ima Shuyster of Dewey, Cheatham, and Howe, Inc. Other cases ……………………………………………………………………………………………… If one author has several different works, replace his name with an underscore in subse-quent references: Fetter, C.W. 1980. Applied Hydrogeology. Columbus, OH: Charles E. Merrill Publishing Company.
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 5: REFERENCES Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 12 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com __________. 1981. The Care and Feeding of Groundhogs. Columbus, OH: Charles E. Merrill Publishing Company. If both works were published in the same year, they would be referenced as follows: Fetter, C. W. 1980a. Applied Hydrogeology. Columbus, OH: Charles E. Merrill Publishing Company. __________. 1980b. The Care and Feeding of Groundhogs. Columbus, OH: Charles E. Merrill Publishing Company. Include page number references for journal articles only ¥ Capitalize all titles. ¥ Minimize the use of abbreviations, except for the state in the place of publishing. ¥ If you must abbreviate a journal title, be sure to use its correct formal abbreviation. ¥ Cite the date of the communication in the text rather than the reference. Citing References Cite references in the main report text as follows: The contours produced by the model (Sapik and others, 1987) suggest that…. Pumping test data were analyzed using a method developed by Theis (1935)…. This conclusion is supported by other studies (Smith, 1985; Jones, 1992) … Results of field investigations by the USGS (Mundorff, 1983 and 1984) … Results of investigations by the United Banjo Federation (Scruggs, 1951a and 1951b)… The City anticipates that taxes will increase because of recent groundwater explo-ration (personal communication, Joe Smith, September 6, 1993)… If you cite the formal name of a report, use italics. Sampling methods are described in 2006 Remediation Work Plan (URS Group, 2006a)… If, however, you cite a report informally, do not use italics. …as presented in the 2006 Remediation Report.
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 5: REFERENCES Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 13 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Citing Figures and Tables Formally introduce a figure, table, or appendix before referring to it without explaining what it is. Figure 6 shows hydrogeologic cross sections A-AÕ and B-BÕ. Introduce figures in orderÑFigure 2 should appear before Figure 3. Discuss all the figures, tables, and appendices that you include in the report.
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 6: COMPOUND MODIFIERS & HYPHENATION Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 14 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Part 6: Compound Modifiers & Hyphenation Compound modifiers contain two words and modify one or more nouns or a noun and ad-jective. The rules for hyphenating compound modifiers are extremely complex; however, we can boil them down to a single axiom: Hyphenate compound terms only when leaving the hyphen out would confuse the reader. Unit Modifiers A Òunit modifierÓ is a compound term such as Òon-siteÓ that functions as a single adjective. It usually modifies one or two nouns such as ÒtestÓ or Òpumping test.Ó Typically, these cas-es require hyphens. We sampled all the on-site wells on June 23, 1995. The term Òon-siteÓ modifies the word ÒwellsÓ and is therefore a unit modifier. The step-rate pumping test began on March 13. The term Òstep-rateÓ modifies the words Òpumping testÓ and is therefore a unit modifier. However, these terms require no hyphen if they do not modify anything. On June 23, 1995, we sampled all wells on site. Since the monitoring program began, the plume has migrated more than 900 feet down gradient. The gravel encountered at 100 feet was well rounded, well graded, and coarse grained. Special Cases Words with Prefixes ………………………………………………………………………………….. Use a hyphen with a prefix only when the root word is a proper noun or when the prefix begins with the same vowel as the root word. re-evaluate pre-Ogallala resample semivolatile
STYLE & USAGE GUIDE PART 6: COMPOUND MODIFIERS & HYPHENATION Plateau Technical Communication Services PAGE 15 Technical Writing & Editing for the Earth Science, Water Resources, & Environmental Fields 928.226.8291 nancy@plateautechcomm.com Industry-Specific Cases …………………………………………………………………………….. Sometimes we hyphenate or combine words simply because of industry conventions. Since the monitoring program began, the plume has migrated more than 900 feet in the downgradient direction. After the test was completed, we ran a downhole video to assess the integrity of the screen assembly. Compound Terms with ÒDataÓ or ÒResultsÓ ………………………………………………….. Do not hyphenate compound terms that modify the word ÒdataÓ or Òresults.Ó water quality results water level data Compound Terms with an Adverb Ending in ÒlyÓ ………………………………………….. Do not hyphenate unit modifiers that contain an adverb ending in Òly.Ó This poorly sorted interval extended fromÉ The previously studied areaÉ Compound Terms with a Comparative or Superlative ……………………………………. Do not hyphenate unit modifiers if the first word in them is a superlative (such as ÒlowestÓ) or comparative (such as ÒhigherÓ). The higher conductivity portion of the deltaic aquifer occursÉ The lowest rated pH meter in the businessÉ Two or More Compound Terms Modifying One Noun Avoid using Òsuspended compoundsÓ: During both the long- and short-term pumping tests, water levels wereÉ

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