REwrite the essay below —Chapter 1 – What is VOC 1. Summary of…

REwrite the essay below
—Chapter 1 – What is VOC
1. Summary of the chapter – in one paragraph, review the content of the chapter
In the first chapter of the Little book of Victim Offender Conferencing by Lorraine Stutzman Amzstutz, we are introduced to the concept of victim offender conferences (VOC). Led by trained facilitators, victims and offenders are brought together in face to face meetings to discuss the impacts and consequences of the crime in question. The VOC process consists of eight steps: referral, screening and case management, first contact, initial meetings, support people, the conference, reporting and monitoring, and closing the case. These eight steps and the victim offender conference process itself are guided by seven values: interconnectedness, respect, transparency, accountability, self determination, spirituality, and truth.
2. Main concepts – what are the main concepts shared by the author?
The main concepts explained in the chapter was the idea that both victims and offenders are given an opportunity to participate in the healing process and talk through the situation. Victims are given a chance to tell their story, express their feelings, seek answers to questions that the legal process has been unable to provide, and discuss restitution options. Offenders are given an opportunity to talk about what happened, to take responsibility for their actions, and to hear personally how their actions impacted the victim.
3. Two questions for the author – what questions would you ask the author about the chapter? Something unclear?
1. How do victims’ rights and concerns factor into the planning and implementation of a victim-offender conference?
2. Can victim-offender conferences be used in cases involving serious or violent crimes?
Chapter 2 – Motives for Participating in a VOC Process
1. Summary of the chapter – in one paragraph, review the content of the chapter
In the second chapter of the Little book of Victim Offender Conferencing, the author informs us of potential reasons why both victims and offenders may want to participate in the VOC process. By using previous stories that shed light on the tragedies that some individuals experienced and directly explaining the process, it becomes known that no matter how minor or major a crime was, the effects following it can be traumatic. While some scenarios can be healed through the help of the community and conversing with those around you, some situations require direct dialogue and interaction with the individual who caused the harm.
2. Main concepts – what are the main concepts shared by the author?
The main concept for this chapter was that both parties involved in the harm are in need of help and have their own reasons for partaking in the conference/meeting. While victims may obviously want restitution, they may also want to hold the offender accountable, learn more about the “why” of the crime, share their pain, and get confirmation from offenders that they won’t offend again. Offenders on the other hand are hoping that through the dialogue, they are able to put the crime behind them and move on, be able to talk about what happened to the victim, have a say in determining and paying restitution, and being able to apologize for what they did.
3. Two questions for the author – what questions would you ask the author about the chapter? Something unclear?
1. While restitution is basically required for victims to fully heal from the offense, doesn’t it also push away offenders from the process due to them potentially being unable to pay?
2. To what extent do offenders have a say in determining and paying restitution?
Chapter 3 – Steps in the VOC Process
1. Summary of the chapter – in one paragraph, review the content of the chapter
In the third chapter of the Little book of Victim Offender Conferencing, we are introduced to the actual process during a VOC. While the overall process of VOC programs is similar in nature, the specifics depend on a program’s design and institutional basis. These specifics/differences can consist of but are not limited to: where referrals come from, who initiates contact with victims and offenders (and in which order), whether referrals are accepted for juveniles, adults, or both, and at what stage in the legal process referrals are made. VOC programs can be very populated with
2. Main concepts – what are the main concepts shared by the author?
The most important concept of the chapter were the steps to using victim offender conferencing. The process consists of six steps: 1. logging, screening, and assignment 2. Initial meetings 3. The meeting 4. Reporting and debriefing 5. Contract follow up 6. And the follow up meeting. The author informs us that this process is not only helpful in terms of healing the damage done between victim and offender, but can also be a huge help or detriment to an individual’s case depending on the overall outcome of the case. Because of this, individuals are encouraged to fully participate with the utmost interest and goal of becoming a better person.
3. Two questions for the author – what questions would you ask the author about the chapter? Something unclear?
1. Could individuals abuse this system to get lower sentences or punishments?
2. Does the facilitator have too much power/too big of a role in the process?
Chapter 4 – Issues in Designing a VOC Program
1. Summary of the chapter – in one paragraph, review the content of the chapter
In the fourth chapter of the Little book of Victim Offender Conferencing, we are introduced to key questions that should be considered when creating victim offender conferencing programs. The list consists of about 20 questions and provides insight on practically any inquiries you might have about the process. Facilitator duties, admission of guilt from the offender, how cases are decided, and even training of facilitators are just a small number of potential areas that one may have to consider if they were to practice a VOC program.
2. Main concepts – what are the main concepts shared by the author?
The main concept for the chapter was the reality of how complicated a VOC program is to set up due to all the intricacies present. For example, whether to choose a community facilitator or a facilitator from the legal system raises respective advantages and disadvantages and ultimately tells us that there is no 100% correct answer. In addition, there is no standardized training for certification in regards to the facilitator role and while there is an annual conference that teaches a wide range of responsibilities and skills, it’s not as accessible nor obtainable for many due to many obstacles (time commitment and finances being two of the major obstacles). These are just two examples of the issues when designing a victim offender conference program.
3. Two questions for the author – what questions would you ask the author about the chapter? Something unclear?
1. Why has there been no official creation of a training program that provides certification for facilitators?
2. Is the 24 hour training session provided at the annual conference a reliable and helpful resource compared to an actual program if it was created? –

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