Research Project: What political lessons did colonists learn from the Stamp Act crisis?

history project and need the explanation and answer to help me learn.

The above-listed student will submit their evaluations of one secondary source and one primary source related to their approved Research Project topic.
Project Topic: “What political lessons did colonists learn from the Stamp Act crisis?”
Background reading on your topic. Start by reading about your topic in your textbook, Wikipedia and any other general information source you find. You want to look for important dates, terms, and names that will help you do a more detailed search for the scholarly secondary and primary sources you post to the discussion board.
All original secondary source and primary source posts must be posted to your Discussion Board by the Week Two deadline. After posting your original source postings, watch for Lee Semmerling’s comments and make any changes he recommends by the end of Week Three, so you get the best grade possible on your final products. Corrections should be posted as replies to him so that Prof. Van Baren can easily follow your progress. *Note: Week Three is for corrections only. If you fail to post your source evaluations by the Week Two deadline, a grade of zero will be earned for each missing source.*
Step One: find a scholarly secondary source.
Watch the videos again on secondary sources and JSTOR. Follow the directions to find a scholarly secondary source that is written by a history expert for other history experts that was originally published in a history journal. The article should be no older than 1980.
Step Two: read, cite, summarize and evaluate your secondary source.
Read the article carefully looking for the main points for your summary. Try to determine the writer’s point of view, what they are trying to prove to their history colleagues. All writers have a point of view try to figure it out.
Use the Considering Your History Sources with a Critical Eye handout Download Considering Your History Sources with a Critical Eye handoutto help evaluate your secondary source.
Write a citation in MLA 9th edition format. Watch the video on JSTOR where instructions on citing are provided. Here is a helpful website from Purdue University Writing Lab https://owl.purdue.edu/owl/research_and_citation/mla_style/mla_formatting_and_style_guide/mla_formatting_and_style_guide.htmlLinks to an external site. and here is a helpful handout on MLA format: How to Cite Sources in Your History Paper Using MLA 9th EditionDownload How to Cite Sources in Your History Paper Using MLA 9th Edition
Create a new thread in the discussion board by clicking reply to the instructions and post your, citation, summary and evaluation before the end of the week deadline.
Use this link to the projects grading rubric document to judge your submission before you post it.Download Use this link to the projects grading rubric document to judge your submission before you post it.
The posting should be in this format:
Format of Secondary Source Post
Subject: – Secondary Source
Hello Professors VanBaren and Semmerling
This is a secondary source
Citation
Summary

Evaluation (See the Considering Your History Sources with a Critical Eye document Download Considering Your History Sources with a Critical Eye documentfor details on each analysis category):
Relevance:
Credibility:
Timeliness:
Dependability:
Point of view:
Use the source
Use the source, but provide other sides of the subject
Use the source, but supplement with more current information
Use the source, but I need to qualify or justify its use in the text of my posting
Not use the source

Step One: find a scholarly primary source.
Using the free web find a primary source that a scholar would use. Scholars often go to archives and museums to read original historical documents and artifacts. We need to see them together, so you will need to find reproductions and transcriptions that are of the quality historians would use and trust. Watch the video on primary sources again to see what the primary sources should look like.
You can try searching using the search: primary source and words, dates and names related to your topic. The primary source needs to come from the free web and not from a library database. Many of the finds will be inappropriate for scholarly research. If you have trouble consider the primary source websites on this research guide that librarian Prof. Lee Semmerling has listed for you to start or ask Lee Semmerling for help.
Step Two: read, cite, summarize and evaluate your primary source.
Read the source carefully looking for the main points for your summary. Try to determine the writer point of view. All writers have a point of view try to figure it out.
Use the Considering Your History Sources with a Critical Eye handout Download Considering Your History Sources with a Critical Eye handoutto help evaluate your primary source.
Write a citation in MLA 8th edition format. This can be very tricky especially for government documents, ask librarian Lee Semmerling for help early and often. Use this page from the Library of Congress on citing primary sources in MLA 8th edition http://www.gov/teachers/usingprimarysourcesmla.htmlLinks to an external site. and convert to 9th edition or the handout How to Cite Sources in Your History Paper Using MLA 9th Edition Download How to Cite Sources in Your History Paper Using MLA 9th Editionhandout Lee Semmerling will suggest changes if you don’t get it right the first time watch for his replies to your posting.
Create another new thread in the discussion board (so you have one for primary and another for secondary) and post your, citation, summary and evaluation before the end of the week deadline.
Use this link to the projects grading rubric document to judge your submission before you post it.Download Use this link to the projects grading rubric document to judge your submission before you post it.
The posting should be in this format:
Subject: – Primary Source
Hello Professors VanBaren and Semmerling
This is a primary source
Citation
Credibility:
Timeliness: Discuss how the date fits the topic/event. Things written exactly at the time of the event may differ from things written long after the event in a memoir
Dependability: Discuss whether the document will be dependably available and not changed. Was the location of the original given so if need be the original could be viewed?
Point of view:
Use the source
Use the source, but provide other sides of the subject
Use the source, but supplement with more current information
Use the source, but I need to qualify or justify its use in the text of my posting

Requirements: Introduction, Primary Sourse, Secondary Sourse.
Primary Source Analysis Grading Rubric Grading Criteria Per Question A 10 pts Conceptual: All questions are addressed. Has cogent analysis, shows command of interpretive and conceptual tasks required by assignment and course materials: ideas original and often insightful. Demonstrates understanding of historical concepts. Language/Grammar: Demonstrates ability to communicate clearly. Uses sophisticated sentences effectively; usually chooses words aptly; observes conventions of written English; makes few minor or technical errors. Use of Assigned Sources: Utilizes and properly cites all sources to support claims with well-chosen examples. B 8.5 pts Conceptual: All questions are addressed, but details are missing and/or concepts are not conveyed clearly. Shows a good understanding of the assigned primary sources, ideas and methods of the assignment. Language/Grammar: May have some grammar errors or occasional problematic word choices or awkward syntax. Use of Assigned Sources: Utilizes and properly cites all sources to support claims appropriately. C 7.5 pts Conceptual: Questions are only partially addressed. Shows an understanding of the basic ideas and information involved in the assignment. May have some factual, interpretive, or conceptual errors. Language/Grammar: Language marred by clichés, colloquialisms, or repeated inexact word choices. Use of Assigned Sources: Utilizes and cites all sources to support claims appropriately. But citations do not follow the assignment requirements. D 6.5 pts Conceptual: 50% or less of the questions addressed. Shows inadequate command of course materials or has significant factual and conceptual errors. Confuses some significant ideas. Language/Grammar: Numerous grammatical errors and stylistic problems seriously distract from the argument. Use of Assigned Sources: Uses but fails to cite one or more of the assigned sources to support claims. F 0 pts Assignment is not submitted. Conceptual: Writer has not understood readings or assignment. Utilizes, and properly cites, outside sources without prior permission from instructor. Does not actually answer the question(s) asked. Use of Assigned Sources: Does not use or does not cite any of the assigned sources to support claims. Use of Outside Sources: The use of outside sources (meaning other than those provided within the textbook) is prohibited in the Primary Source Analysis assignment instructions unless the student seeks and receives prior approval from the instructor.
Podcast Reflection Assignment Grading Rubric Grading Criteria A Podcast and Episode are identified. All four topics and why they are of interest are listed and described in a thorough and thoughtful way. Question related to the episode is listed. Demonstrates understanding of historical concepts and utilizes provided sources appropriately. Demonstrates ability to communicate clearly. B Podcast and Episode are identified. All four topics and why they are of interest are listed, but descriptions lack detail and/or concepts are not clearly conveyed. Question related to the episode is listed. C Podcast and Episode are identified. Topics and why they are of interest are only partially listed OR lack descriptions OR lack why topics are of interest. Question related to the episode is listed. D Podcast Episode title NOT identified. OR Topics of interest are NOT listed. OR Question related to the episode is NOT listed. OR One or more time stamp citations are missing. OR Response fails to demonstrate that the student actively listened to the entire episode. F Assignment was not submitted.
Research Project Grading Rubric Grading Criteria Ratings Primary Source: Citation 5 pts possible Source is accurately cited using the MLA 8th edition format. 5 pts. An attempt to cite the source is made AND important information is present, BUT fails to precisely follow MLA 8th edition format. 3.5 pts An attempt to cite the source is made, but important information is missing. 1.5 pts No citation. OR Citation attempt is so incomplete it is not possible to find source. OR Provided source is not a college-level scholarly source from the free web. OR Did not submit a primary source by the Week Two deadline. 0 pts Primary Source: Summary 10 pts possible Thorough summary that demonstrates the source was read and includes comments regarding how the source relates to the approved topic. 10 pts Thorough summary that demonstrates the source was read, BUT fails to relate the source to the approved topic. 7.5 pts Summary lacks detail to demonstrate source was read. 4.0 No summary. OR Provided source is not a college-level scholarly source from the free web. OR Did not submit a primary source by the Week Two deadline. 0 pts Primary Source: Evaluation 15 pts possible Thorough and accurate evaluation of source in all analysis categories. 15 pts All analysis categories addressed, but details are missing and/or concepts are not conveyed clearly. 12 pts Analysis categories are only partially addressed. OR One or more analysis category is missing from evaluation. 7 pts No evaluation. OR Provided source is not a college-level scholarly source from the free web. OR Did not submit a primary source by the Week Two deadline. 0 pts Secondary Source: Citation 5 pts possible Source is accurately cited using the MLA 8th edition format. 5 pts. An attempt to cite the source is made AND important information is present, BUT fails to precisely follow MLA 8th edition format. 3.5 pts An attempt to cite the surce is made, but important information is missing. 1.5 pts No citation. OR Citation attempt is so incomplete it is not possible to find source. OR Provided source is not a college-level scholarly secondary source from the MVCC Library Databases. OR Did not submit a secondary source by the Week Two deadline. 0 pts Secondary Source: Summary 10 pts possible Thorough summary that demonstrates the source was read and includes comments regarding how the source relates to the approved topic. 10 pts Thorough summary that demonstrates the source was read, BUT fails to relate the source to the approved topic. 7.5 pts Summary lacks detail to demonstrate source was read. 4.0 No summary. OR Provided source is not a college-level scholarly secondary source from the MVCC Library Databases. OR Did not submit a secondary source by the Week Two deadline. 0 pts Secondary Source: Evaluation 15 pts possible Thorough and accurate evaluation of source in all analysis categories. 15 pts All analysis categories addressed, but details are missing and/or concepts are not conveyed clearly. 12 pts Analysis categories are only partially addressed. OR One or more analysis category is missing from evaluation. 7 pts No evaluation. OR Provided source is not a college-level scholarly secondary source from the MVCC Library Databases. OR Did not submit a secondary source by the Week Two deadline. 0 pts Total Project Points Possible: 60
How to Cite Sources in Your History Paper
Using MLA 9th Edition
Primary sources are special cases so make sure you cite them properly.
For example an original letter would be cited as:
Reynolds, John F. Letter to Cate Reynolds, 2 September 1861.
But if found in an archive the citation includes the archive collection and the archives they are found in:
Reynolds, John F. “Letter to Cate Reynolds,” 2 September 1861.
     Reynolds Family Papers. Franklin and Marshall College,
     Archives and Special Collections, Lancaster, PA.
Once it is published in a book of letters you have to cite the book (colored blue below) it was found in too, like this:
Reynolds, William. “To Lydia Reynolds,” 2 June 1839. Reynolds Letters of the
     Voyage to the Southern Ocean, edited by Ann Hoffman Cleaver and
     Jeffrey Stann, Naval Institute Press, 1988, 68-69.
Or if the source is reproduced on a website:
Jefferson, Thomas. “To the Brothers of the Choctaw Nation,” 17 Dec.1803. The Avalon Project. Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School,
Or if the source is reproduced as a letter from a book on a library database it must include the book the database used and the database information. For example:
Kennedy, John F. “President Kennedy’s Letter to Khrushchev of October 25 Responding to Khrushchev’s Letter of October 24.” Chadwyck-Healey Historical Documents, Chadwyck-Healey Ltd., 2005. History Study Center, .
 
Or if a website puts a copy of a book of letters the citation includes the letter in the book as well as the website. For example:
Hamilton, Alexander. “To the Provincial Congress,” 1776. A Few of Hamilton’s Letters: Including His Description of the Great West Indian Hurricane of 1772, edited by Gertrude Atherton, The Macmillan Co. 1903, pp. 11-13. Internet Archive,
Additional primary source citation help
The Library of Congress How to Cite Electronic Sources page explains how to cite various types of electronic primary sources in MLA and Chicago Styles .
Secondary Source Journal articles on a database
Citations of secondary source journal articles found on databases should include the article and the title of the database used to access the article.
For JSTOR Articles
Nichols, David A. “”The Showpiece of Our Nation”: Dwight D. Eisenhower and the Desegregation of the District of Columbia.” Washington History, vol. 16 no.2, 2004, pp. 44-65. JSTOR,
The MVCC library Citing Sources Guide
has links to additional helpful information on citing sources.
Avoid Plagiarism with Proper Citation Using MLA 9th Ed.

Examples of quoting
Original Passage from:
Twain, Mark, Following the Equator and Anti-Imperialist Essays. Oxford University Press, 1996.
As a quote this original passage is indented as a block if it is more than a line or two. Like this:
History requires a world of time and bitter hard work when your “education” is no further advanced than the cat’s; when you are merely stuffing yourself with a mixed-up mess of empty names and random incidents and elusive dates; which no one teaches you how to interpret, and which, uninterrupted, pay you not a farthing’s value for your waste of time (Twain 603).
The quote could also be introduced as a quote by Twain in the text and then Twain is left out of the parenthetical citation:
In this class, I am looking for something more than simply learning about dates and places. In the great words of Mark Twain,
…when you are merely stuffing yourself with a mixed-up mess of empty names and random incidents and elusive dates; which no one teaches you how to interpret, and which, uninterrupted, pay you not a farthing’s value for your waste of time (603).
I do not intend to waste my time, but instead strive to be a true historian who can interpret what has happened.
Examples of Paraphrasing
If you paraphrase using the original idea you must cite the original. Like this:
 
In this class, I do not just want to learn random incidents, empty names, and elusive dates.  These things have no value and learning them is a waste of my time.  I want to learn to interpret these things. (Twain 603)
 
The following passage is plagiarized from the original Mark Twain passage because the idea is Twain’s and it was not cited.
 
In this class, my goal is to become more than a mere encyclopedia.  When you are merely stuffing yourself with a mixed up mess of empty names and random incidents and elusive dates you just waste your time.  I want to know how to interpret the facts, the names, and random incidents.
 
The passage instead needs to cite where the idea came from. Like this:
 
In this class, I am looking for something more than memorizing.  I don’t want to just fill my head with names, incidents, and with dates, because a true education should instruct the student to interpret these facts (Twain 603).
Indirect Quotes
If you found this quote from the book Following the Equator and Anti-Imperialist Essays in another book, article or web page… remember you cite the secondary source you found it in not the original book that the secondary source cites.
The Quotable Mark Twain provides this view of the study of history by Twain:
History requires a world of time and bitter hard work when your “education” is no further advanced than the cat’s; when you are merely stuffing yourself with a mixed-up mess of empty names and random incidents and elusive dates; which no one teaches you how to interpret, and which, uninterrupted, pay you not a farthing’s value for your waste of time (qtd. In Quotable Mark Twain).
Work Cited
Quotable Mark Twain, The. Oxford University, 1996, Oxford.edu/quotabletwain.html. Accessed 12 June 1995.
(This is a made up example of website citation with no author)
Page 1 of 2 Semmerling October 2016 Considering Your History Sources with a Critical Eye Apply the below evaluation to your primary and secondary sources. If the source fails to meet the evaluation criteria you should probably seek a new source. Although in this project your evaluations are from a historian’s point of view, the following equation pertains to evaluating all sources. Relevance + Credibility + Timeliness + Dependability + Point of view = A Good Source. o Relevance: How well does the source fit your information need? Primary: How well does it relate to your topic and is the source equivalent to what a scholar would use? Scholars use primary sources digitized and transcribed by museums, libraries and archives. They do not use PBS, History Channel or teachers’ websites. They want whole documents not just excerpts. Secondary: Does it help answer your topic and is it what a historian would use? Historians do not read popular history for research. When researching, they read articles and books written by historians for other historians. Is your source written by a historian for other historians in a history journal? o Credibility: How trustworthy is the source? Primary: Can you trust that it is a true complete copy? Do you trust the organization that distributes it to have verified its authenticity? You may have to read the websites about page to see if you trust the information on the website. Does the website provide a citation for where the original document or item is located? Secondary: Good authors include their credentials. If they don’t, try doing a search on their name to find out more about them. The author should have history credentials. Historians do their research differently than economists, physicians and journalists. When studying history use articles by historians, unless you check with your professor. Credible authors also back up what they say with citations. History scholars usually use a works cited list, foot notes or endnotes. If the article does not have citations it is not likely scholarly. Scholarly journal articles and books are usually edited by someone other than the author. Editors check the work for clear writing and accurate sources. The articles are also reviewed and edited by panels of experts in a process called peer review. Historians use articles published in peer reviewed history journals. Check your article to see what journal it comes from and make sure it is a scholarly history journal.
Page 2 of 2 Semmerling October 2016 o Timeliness: Is the primary source from the time period? Is the secondary source current enough? Primary: The date needs to be close to the date of the event you are studying and from someone that lived at the time. Secondary: Views of history change and new information is always being found. If written before the Women’s Rights and Civil Rights movements the author will have a different view of historical events than we do today. Explain why you think the date of your article suggests a modern view of ethnicity, gender and culture. Try to find history sources no older than 1980 unless approved by your professor. You also want an article that would be current with new discoveries and current research. If you can only find an article that is over ten years old explain that if doing a paper you would want to continue searching additional newer research. o Dependability: Will the source be there when others follow up on your research? Primary: Many Web sources are here today and gone tomorrow. In addition, Web sources are meant to be easily modified. Do you trust the website to keep an unchanged copy for a long time and why? Does the website tell you where the original can be found? Secondary: Is the source well indexed in a database? When sources are well indexed, you and others can find the source again more easily. Journals that have been originally published in print before being put in a database are not likely to change the content once it is digitized. Originals of print articles can also be obtained from the publisher. o Point of View: What is the point of view of the source? Primary sources will always have a point of view to consider. Peoples letters and diaries will always be one sided. Evaluate them carefully so you can identify their point of view. For example in the revolutionary war the point of view will be affected by which side were they on? Secondary: No one is completely objective. Even expert historians have a point of view. They are usually trying to convince their colleagues they have discovered a new view of the evidence or found new evidence. Read the first few paragraphs and the last few to discover what they are trying to explain or prove. If they talk about controversy among historians, what side of a subject are they taking? o After considering the source critically decide to: o Use the source o Use the source, but provide other sides of the subject o Use the source, but supplement with more current information o Use the source, but I need to qualify or justify its use in the text of my posting o Not use the source

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