Medical Terminology Medical terminology on the quiz will be…

Medical Terminology
Medical terminology on the quiz will be fill in the blank. Spelling matters! Students may be given a definition and asked for the correct term or students may be asked to provide the definition of a given term.
Students are expected to combine various prefixes, roots, and suffixes to come up with medical terms. Items on your quiz may be these exact terms or combinations of prefixes, roots, and/or suffixes used below.
Define each of these terms then mix and match – for example, hyperglycemia is listed below, but students would also be expected to mix and match to define hypoglycemia because the prefix -hypo is also included in one of the terms in the list below.
Thoracotomy
Colostomy
Dysphagia
Hemoptysis
Stomatitis
Hemiparalysis
Paraplegia
Tachypnea
Bradycardia
Hepatology
Neurologist
Lipoma
Hyperglycemia
Hypoventilation
Pericarditis
Pulmonary fibrosis
Erythrocyte
Nephrotoxic
Abbreviations
Abbreviations will also be fill in the blank items on the quiz. Students may be asked for the correct abbreviation for a provided term or to type the correct term for a provided abbreviation. Spelling matters!
A few of these listed below will populate multiple definitions in CP+. In those circumstances I have included the most common use of this term, which is also what is expected for this course.
Here is a list of commonly used abbreviations.
ABG (arterial blood gas)
AC&HS
ad lib
b.i.d. (also seen as BID or bid)
BUN
c/o
CXR
DNR
DOE (dyspnea on exertion)
Dx
ECG (also seen as EKG)
ETOH
F/U (also seen as f/u; follow up)
h/o
Hx (history)
I&D (incision and drainage)
NKDA
n.p.o. (also seen as NPO)
N/V (also seen as N&V)
p.c.
PMH (past medical history)
p.o. (also seen as PO)
p.r.n. or PRN (as needed)
qh, q2h, q3h, etc.
QID (also seen as q.i.d.)
ROM (range of motion)
ROS (review of systems)
R/O or r/o
S/P or s/p
s/sx
t.i.d. (also seen as TID)
UA or U/A (urinalysis)
US (ultrasound)
VSS (vital signs stable)
WNL
Labs
Lab questions will all be multiple choice.
Students are responsible for the normal, serum, adult reference ranges for all labs listed below.
Chemistry
Sodium
Potassium
Calcium
Glucose
Chloride
BUN
Creatinine
CBC/hematology labs
White blood cell count
Platelet count
Hemoglobin
Hematocrit
Absolute neutrophil count

Pharmacology Principles
Pharmacology questions will all be multiple choice.
Questions will focus on the main points – not every last detail in pharmacology references.
Students are to complete the table using the metoprolol example provided.
Basics:
Generic name of medication, pharm. classification
Mechanism of action? (Students will not be tested on, but knowing this will make it much easier to remember the rest.) Common indications for this medication? Safe Dosage Range (students must know this for clinical, but won’t be tested on this unless specifically indicated by FOR)
Common reasons to withhold the medication or clarify the order.
Important teaching points about this medication, including life threatening and common side effects? (Ask yourself, “what if this works too well?”)
Additional, pertinent notes.
Ex: post administration assessment findings, special considerations, key points to know.
Metoprolol
Pharm class: beta blocker
Selective beta1 blocker; decreases cardiac output, peripheral resistance, and cardiac oxygen consumption; depresses renin secretion Tachyarrhythmias, HTN, heart failure, myocardial infarction 25mg – 200 mg PO once or twice daily; IV 5mg IVP
Low BP, orthostatic hypotension, bradycardia (HR <60) Most common side effects include: dizziness, bradycardia, hypotension, orthostatic hypotension, fatigue Life threatening side effects: HF and bronchospasm as well as severe drops in BP/HR. Increases the risk for falls Pt may need to be taught how to check peripheral pulse and/or BP and which parameters for those VS would mean they should not take this medication. Do not abruptly stop. Watch trends of BP/HR as it relates to timing of medication administration. Furosemide Methylprednisolone Lisinopril Albuterol Ondansetron Insulin (aspart and lantus) Key differences between aspart and lantus Heparin Describe key differences between SQ dosing and IV dosing Warfarin Lisinopril Morphine Atorvastatin Ibuprofen Nitroglycerin Acetaminophen Metronidazole Cefepime Vitamin K Lorazepam Pantoprazole

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