Film Question

Please use 12-point Times typeface and double-space your essay.
Please do not use fan-based websites such as Wikipedia.
Please analyze only the required film in your essay. There is no need to list
the film as a source in your bibliography.
The sample essay provides an example of how to organize and format your paper. Please also review the outline provided for your chosen topic.
Watch the required movie for the topic The movie listed below can be
rented on Amazon Prime for $2.99 to $3.99
The Black Movie Boom of the 1990s
Required Film: Do the Right Thing
(Spike Lee, 1989)
1)Baker, Houston. “Spike Lee and the Commerce of Culture,”Black American Cinema,ed. Manthia Diawara, New York: Routledge, 1993, pp. 168-176.
2)Belton, John. “Reaganite Cinema,”American Cinema/American Culture, New York:McGraw-Hill, 2013, pp. 361-382.
3) Bordwell, David and Kristin Thompson.Film Art: An Introduction, 5thEd. New York:McGraw-Hill, 1997, pp. 393-399.
4) Guerrero, Ed.Framing Blackness: The African-American Image in Film, Philadelphia:Temple University Press, 1993), pp. 146-155.
5) Watkins, S. Craig.Representing: Hip Hop Culture and the Production of Black
Cinema, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998, pp. 155-159.
Write an organized, detailed five-page analysis of the film which illustrates the points made in the outline and the readings that correspond to your topic.Please incorporate observations from your notes that support these points. Page six of your essay should be a bibliography that cites your sources in the format provided under each topic below.
I have attached the sample Essay and other related stuff as well.

Requirements: Detailed
Please use 12-point Times typeface and double-space your essay.
Please do not use fan-based websites such as Wikipedia.
Please analyze only the required film in your essay. There is no need to list
the film as a source in your bibliography.
The sample essay provides an example of how to organize and format your paper. Please also review the outline provided for your chosen topic.
Watch the required movie for the topic The movie listed below can be
rented on Amazon Prime for $2.99 to $3.99
The Black Movie Boom of the 1990s
Required Film: Do the Right Thing
(Spike Lee, 1989)
1)Baker, Houston. “Spike Lee and the Commerce of Culture,”Black American Cinema,ed. Manthia Diawara, New York: Routledge, 1993, pp. 168-176.
2)Belton, John. “Reaganite Cinema,”American Cinema/American Culture, New York:McGraw-Hill, 2013, pp. 361-382.
3) Bordwell, David and Kristin Thompson.Film Art: An Introduction, 5thEd. New York:McGraw-Hill, 1997, pp. 393-399.
4) Guerrero, Ed.Framing Blackness: The African-American Image in Film, Philadelphia:Temple University Press, 1993), pp. 146-155.
5) Watkins, S. Craig.Representing: Hip Hop Culture and the Production of Black
Cinema, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998, pp. 155-159.
Write an organized, detailed five-page analysis of the film which illustrates the points made in the outline and the readings that correspond to your topic.Please incorporate observations from your notes that support these points. Page six of your essay should be a bibliography that cites your sources in the format provided under each topic below.
I have attached the sample Essay and other related stuff as well.
Outline for Topic #5: Do the Right Thing
This outline is a guide for structuring your paper. You should consider it a skeleton for your paper that you should flesh out with ideas and interpretations drawn from your bibliographical sources, the textbook, and the notes you take while watching and analyzing the movie.
I. Introduction: Do the Right Thing sparked a renaissance in African-American filmmaking during the 1990s. The film’s power stems in part from its embodiment of a Reagan-era “countercurrent” of filmmaking, its success in targeting an African-American audience, and its stylistic sophistication.
II. Body
1. African-American Filmmaking Boom of the 1990s
A. Box-Office Considerations: Spike Lee’s Do the Right Thing spearheaded a 1990s renaissance in films by African-American directors. The 1990s black filmmaking movement was initiated by softening box-office receipts as Hollywood found itself overinvested in big-budget productions that failed at the box office. Within this bleak economic context, Hollywood turned to the size and consumer power of the black audience, estimated to be 25 to 30 percent of the movie going public.
B. Countercurrents: Hollywood appealed to an underserved African-American audience by dramatizing conditions of muted frustration arising from inner city, black-on-black violence that contradicted Reagan-era teen cinema’s frequent vision of America as white, middle-class, and rooted in small-town traditions of community and racial harmony. Do The Right Thing questions Reagan-era cinema’s construction of America as white, middle-class, and rooted in small-town tradition.
2. Budgets for Movies Targeting African-American Audience
A. Do the Right Thing’s Modest Budget: Hollywood typically budgets a meager $1.5 million to $10 million for movies with African-American ensemble casts with the expectation of turning a profit from a strictly African-American audience. The ability of African-American directors like Spike Lee to direct films on modest budgets enabled young adult black filmmakers to control the representation of African-American youth culture in Hollywood cinema.
B. Do the Right Thing’s Representation of African-American Culture: The practice of black filmmaking represents an important shift in Hollywood’s representation of African-American youth. If Hollywood has historically defined men as the bearer of the gaze and women as the object of the gaze, the African-American filmmaking movement of the 1990s signals a shift from making African-Americans the passive object of the camera’s gaze to the active and creative agent who frames the look.
3. 1990s African-American Crime Dramas
A. Do the Right Thing as African-American Crime Drama: Do the Right Thing served as a catalyst for African-American crime dramas that focus on the plight of urban youth plagued by violence and racial and ethnic tensions. As a 20-something African-American filmmaker and native of Brooklyn, Director Spike Lee drew upon first-hand experience in dramatizing the complexities of urban violence and racial and ethnic tensions that plagued urban areas during the Reagan era.
B. Stereotyping of African-American Youth Culture: The media during the 1990s frequently stereotyped African-American youth as urban “gangstas,” creating a dilemma for filmmakers such as Spike Lee. In dramatizing the long-suppressed conditions of 1990s inner-city culture, African-American crime dramas risked falling into the trap of stereotyping black youth as criminals, as Blaxploitation had done during the early 1970s.
C. Stereotypes in Do the Right Thing: Lee does fall into stereotyping. By showing a young black male, Radio Raheem, instigating violence, Lee creates an image of young black males as self-destructive and inarticulate. The film also fails to explore how racism is linked to sexism. Tina is constructed as a sex object who manipulates Mookie through sex rather than getting what she wants through self-assertive negotiation. The narrative design of Do the Right Thing conversely imaginatively violates classical Hollywood narrative formula.
4. Do the Right Thing as Cinematic Text
A. Dramatic Unities of Action, Space, and Time: The dramatic unities of action, space, and time provide a convenient means of analyzing Lee’s narrative strategy. Do the Right Thing observes the dramatic unities of space and time, but violates the dramatic unity of action in order to explore the complexities of race relations between the characters.
a. Unity of Action: Lee violates the dramatic unity of action (which bases character motivation on a single, well-defined narrative goal) in order to explore the complexities of urban racial and ethnic tensions. Classical Hollywood narrative typically orders stories on the basis of two causal strands of action involving action and romance. Do the Right Thing orders the strand of action on the basis of the community’s relation to Sal and his sons, and the strand of romance on the basis of Mookie’s personal life. Mookie and Sal’s goals are vaguely defined. Mookie’s goal is to “get paid,” and Sal’s goal is to keep his pizzeria operating in the face of rising racial tensions. In downplaying individual goals, the film focuses on a crucial group goal that motivates all of the characters: can the ensemble of characters learn to peacefully share the single block where they all live?
b. Unity of Space: Lee conforms to the dramatic unity of space (which restricts setting to a specific, well-defined location). Do the Right Thing is set on one block of the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood in Brooklyn. Sal’s Pizzeria creates a spatial anchor at one end of the block, and the Korean market creates a spatial anchor at the other end of the block. The pizzeria symbolizes a longstanding tension between the neighborhood’s Italian-American and African-American cultures, while the market symbolizes the additional cultural complexities that have arisen with the more recent arrival of Asian immigrants.
c. Unity of Time: Lee observes the dramatic unity of time (which restricts a story to one uninterrupted unit of time) by restricting the story to a single 24-hour period that begins the morning of the hottest day of the summer and ends the following morning. The motif of heat symbolizes the racial tensions that boil over with the destruction of Sal’s Pizzeria.
B. Cinematic Style: Like the narrative structure, the cinematic style of Do the Right Thing stretches traditional techniques of classical filmmaking.
a. Editing: The film alternates between discontinuous editing typical of music videos and television commercials and conventional editing techniques such as shot/reverse shot patterns and long, unbroken takes and tracking shots that emphasize the spatial interconnectedness of the neighborhood and its residents.
b. Sound: A dense soundtrack helps characterize the community. As Mookie walks past a row of houses, the sounds of radios tuned to different stations fade up and down, hinting at the offscreen presence of the inhabitants. The music broadcast by the DJ plays a large role in drawing the many brief scenes together, with the same songs carrying over various exchanges of dialogue. Different ethnic groups are characterized by the types of music to which they listen.
c. The Symbolism of Pino, Vito, and Mookie’s Clothing: Race for Lee is presented in terms of cultural style. The characters wear t-shirts that identify their cultural politics and style. Mookie wears a Jackie Robinson jersey that symbolizes the position of a black who breaks the color line in a white man’s world, as Lee has done in Hollywood. Mookie also wears a shirt with his name on it and the Sal’s Pizzeria logo, indicating his position between the two worlds.
Conclusion: Do the Right Thing is one of the most critically acclaimed films of the 1990s, largely because the film opened the door for a wave of African-American filmmakers and because of director Spike Lee’s imaginative conformity to and violation of classical Hollywood narrative and visual styles.
Bibliography
1)Belton, John. “Into the Twenty-First Century,” American Cinema/American Culture, New York: McGraw-Hill, 2013, pp. 387-412.
2) Bordwell, David and Kristin Thompson. Film Art: An Introduction, 5th Ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1997, pp. 393-399.
3) Shary, Timothy. “Delinquent Youth: Having Fun, On the Loose, In Trouble,” Generation Multiplex: The Image of Youth in Contemporary American Cinema, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2002, pp. 80-135.
4) Watkins, S. Craig. Representing: Hip Hop Culture and the Production of Black Cinema, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1998, pp. 155-159.

Similar Posts

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *